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Today in Black History, 10/31/2014

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• October 31, 1896 Ethel Waters, hall of fame gospel, blues and jazz vocalist and actress, was born in Chester, Pennsylvania. Waters began singing professionally in 1913 and for several years toured on the Black vaudeville circuit. In 1921, she recorded “The New York Glide” and “At the New Jump Steady Ball.” In 1933, Waters starred in the all-Black film “Rufus Jones for President.” That same year, she took a role in the Broadway musical revue “As Thousands Cheer” where she was the first Black woman in an otherwise White show. In 1949, Waters was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for the film “Pinky” and in 1950 won the New York Drama Critics Award for her performance in the play “The Member of the Wedding.” Also in 1950, she starred in the television series “Beulah” but quit after complaining that the scripts portrayal of African Americans was degrading. In 1962, Waters was nominated for the Emmy Award for Outstanding Single Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role for an appearance on the television show “Route 66.” Waters died September 1, 1977. She was posthumously inducted into the Gospel Music Association Hall of Fame in 1984. In 1994, the United States Postal Service issued a commemorative postage stamp in her honor. Waters’ recordings “Dinah” (1925), “Am I Blue” (1929), and “Stormy Weather” (1933) were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame as “qualitatively or historically significant.” In 2004, “Stormy Weather” was listed on the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress as “culturally, historically, or aesthetically important.” Waters authored two autobiographies, “His Eye is on the Sparrow: An Autobiography” (1951) and “To Me, It’s Wonderful” (1972). A biography, “Heat Wave: The Life and Career of Ethel Waters,” was published in 2011.

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The Charles H. Wright Museum Women’s Committee Annual Wine Tasting Event

Posted by Pam Perry
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An Elegant Evening of Fine Wines and Good Times

Guests will experience a variety of fine wines, food and desserts from Detroit caterers and restaurants plus scintillating live entertainment on Saturday, November 1, 2014
2014-Wine-Tasting-Event-Detroit-Women's Committee

The Charles H. Wright Women’s Committee Annual Wine Tasting Event

Whether you are a wine connoisseur or one of those who can only tell red from white, the Charles H. Wright Museum Women’s Committee annual wine tasting fundraiser will be an enchanting night of delight.  The event, “Pairing Great Brands with a Taste of Detroit, takes place at the Wright Museum on Saturday, November 1 from 6 to 10 p.m. at 315 E. Warren, Detroit, Michigan.

“You don’t need to be wine savvy to have a good time at this wine tasting,” said Rebecca Holland, Women’s Committee vice president. “Not everyone is a wine aficionado that’s why we will have experts there to lead the tasting, to answer questions, and to give the event the feel of an official wine tasting.” Vino Dreams, a company from Detroit, will host the wine tasting classes.

Besides fine wines, guests will enjoy a “Taste of Detroit” with fabulous signature dishes from Whole Foods Market Detroit, Signature Grille Restaurant and Jackson Five Star Catering, Touch of Class Caterers and Upscale Dining. “There will even be a Chocolate Bar – with gourmet chocolate items from Chocolatetou,”said Holland.

 

The Women’s Committee, whose main goal is to raise funds for the museum, also hosts a silent auction during the wine tasting affair every year.  General admission tickets are only $60; limited VIP tickets are available from $100. Purchase tickets at the museum, by phone at (800) 838-3006, or online at http://thewright.org.  Phone and online tickets are subject to service charge.

“We are so delighted with the members of The Women’s Committee who have donated their time and talent to help the Wright,” said Juanita Moore, President/CEO.  “This awesome committee of volunteers helps so much to further our mission of art, literacy and culture in the African American community. Their events are amazing.”

About the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

Founded in 1965 and located at 315 East Warren Avenue in Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is the world's largest institution dedicated to the African American experience. For more information please visit TheWright.org or call (313) 494-5800. Follow the Wright on social media: Twitter @thewrightmuseum Instagram @thewrightmuseum  Facebook @thewrightmuseum

 

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Today in Black History, 10/30/2014

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• October 30, 1895 Ossian Haven Sweet, physician, was born in Orlando, Florida. At six, Sweet witnessed the lynching and burning of a neighbor who had been accused of raping a White girl. That memory would haunt Sweet throughout his life. In 1917, Sweet earned his Bachelor of Science degree from Wilberforce University and from there he went to Howard University where he earned his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1921. Sweet then moved to Detroit, Michigan where he could not find work at a hospital due to his race. He was able to establish an office in “Black Bottom” where overpopulation and an influx of migrants who lacked medical care caused diseases and created threats to life. Recognizing the need for further medical training, in 1923 Sweet moved to Vienna and Paris to study. In Paris, he was able to experience life without prejudice and for the first time was treated as an equal to White people. Sweet returned to Detroit in 1924 and started work at Dunbar Hospital, Detroit’s first Black hospital. In 1925, Sweet bought a house in an all-White neighborhood of Detroit. On September 9, the second day after the Sweets had moved in, a crowd of 300 to 400 White people gathered and began to throw stones at the house. Several of Sweet’s friends and relatives were in the house and armed. Shots were fired from the house and one White man was killed. All eleven African Americans in the house were arrested. After two trials, Sweet and the others were acquitted of murder charges by an all-White jury. After the acquittal, Sweet’s life went downhill due to the death of his daughter and wife and financial difficulties. On March 20, 1960, Sweet committed suicide. The Ossian H. Sweet House in Detroit was listed on the National Register of Historic Places April 4, 1985. “Arc of Justice: A Saga of Race, Civil Rights, and Murder in the Jazz Age” (2004) tells the story of Sweet and his battle for equality. Sweet’s name is enshrined in the Ring of Genealogy at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan.

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Today in Black History, 10/29/2014

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• October 29, 1866 James Pierson Beckwourth, mountain man, fur trader and explorer, died. Beckwourth was born enslaved April 6, 1798 in Frederick County, Virginia. His owner emancipated him in 1824 and Beckwourth joined a fur trapping company on an expedition to explore the Rocky Mountains. In 1826, he was captured by the Crow Indians and for the next 8 or 9 years lived with them, rising in their society from warrior to chief. During the Mexican American War, Beckwourth served as a courier for the United States Army. In 1850, he was credited for discovering what came to be called the Beckwourth Pass, a passage through the Sierra Nevada Mountains. In the mid-1850s, Beckwourth began ranching in the Sierra and his ranch, trading post, and hotel were the starting settlement of what became Beckwourth, California. In 1996, in recognition of his contribution to the city’s development, the City of Marysville, California officially renamed the city’s largest park Beckwourth Riverfront Park. Beckwourth published his autobiography, “The Life and Adventures of James P. Beckwourth: Mountaineer, Scout and Pioneer, and Chief of the Crow Nation of Indians,” in 1856.

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Today in Black History, 10/28/2014

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• October 28, 1918 Edward Alexander Bouchet, educator and the first African American to earn a Ph. D. from an American university, died. Bouchet was born September 15, 1852 in New Haven, Connecticut. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Yale College in 1874 and based on his academic performance was the first Black person nominated to Phi Beta Kappa but was not elected until 1884. Bouchet returned to Yale and in 1876 earned his Ph. D. in physics. Unable to find a university teaching position due to racism, he moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where he taught physics and chemistry at the Institute for Colored Youth (now Cheney University) for the next 26 years. Bouchet resigned in 1902 and from 1905 to 1908 was director of academics at St. Paul’s Normal and Industrial School (now St. Paul’s College). From 1908 to 1913, he served as principal and teacher at a high school in Ohio before joining the faculty of Bishop College in 1913. Illness forced him to retire in 1916. The American Physical Society presents the Edward A. Bouchet Award to outstanding physicists for their contributions to physics and in 2005 Yale and Howard universities founded the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society. The Edward Bouchet Abdue Salam Institute in South Africa is named in his honor.

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Today in Black History, 10/27/2014

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• October 27, 1917 Oliver Reginald Tambo, co-founder of the African National Congress Youth League, was born in Pondoland, South Africa. Tambo won a scholarship to Fort Hare, the only college that Black people could attend, but was expelled in 1939 for participating in a student strike. He later studied law by correspondence and qualified as an attorney in 1952. In 1943, he along with Nelson Mandela and Walter Sisulu founded the ANC Youth League with Tambo as national secretary. In 1955, Tambo became secretary general of the ANC and in 1958 became deputy president. In 1959, Tambo was banned by the South African government and the ANC sent him to England to mobilize opposition to apartheid. He returned to South Africa in 1990 and was elected national chair of the ANC in July, 1991. Tambo died April 24, 1993. In October, 2006, the airport in Johannesburg was renamed Tambo International Airport in his honor.

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Today in Black History, 10/26/2014

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• October 26, 1885 Robert Reed Church, Jr., businessman and political activist, was born in Memphis, Tennessee. Church earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from Oberlin College in 1904 and his Master of Business Administration degree from the Packard School of Business. After returning to Memphis, he became president of Solvent Savings Bank and presided over the family’ real estate holdings. In 1916, Church founded and financed the Lincoln League which was established to increase Black voter registration and participation. Within a short time, the league had registered more than 10,000 voters. Church organized the Memphis branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1917 and was elected to the national board representing 14 southern states in 1919. He was a prominent Republican and served as a delegate to eight consecutive Republican National Conventions between 1912 and 1940. With the advent of the New Deal in the 1930s and African American defection to the Democratic Party, Church’s political influence dwindled and he moved to Chicago, Illinois where he was elected chair of the Republican American Committee, a group of 200 Black Republican leaders who pressured Republican congressmen to vote in favor of civil rights legislation. Church died April 17, 1952. “The Robert R. Churches of Memphis: A Father and Son Who Achieved in Spite of Race” was published in 1974.

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Today in Black History, 10/25/2014

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• October 25, 1893 Joseph Charles Price, founder and first president of Livingston College, died. Price was born February 10, 1854 in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. He graduated as class valedictorian from Lincoln University in 1879 and was appointed to the African Methodist Episcopal Church’s delegation to the World Ecumenical Conference in London, England. In London, Price amazed audiences with his powerful speaking and was called “The World’s Orator” by the British press. Over the next year, Price raised $10,000 and returned to North Carolina in 1882 to open Livingston College. Price served as president of the college until his death. In 1890, he was elected president of the National Protective Association and that same year was voted one of the “Ten Greatest Negroes Who Ever Lived.” His biography, “Joseph Charles Price, Educator and Race Leader,” was published in 1943. In 1967, a North Carolina Highway Historical Marker was dedicated in his honor in Elizabeth City.

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Today in Black History, 10/24/2014

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• October 24, 1896 Marjorie Stewart Joyner, inventor of the permanent wave machine, was born in Monterey, Virginia. In 1916, Joyner became the first African American to graduate from the A. B. Molar Beauty School in Chicago, Illinois. After graduating, she went to work for Madam C. J. Walker, overseeing 200 of her beauty schools as the national advisor. On November 27, 1928, she received patent number 1,693,515 for her invention of the permanent wave machine which could be used to curl or straighten hair by wrapping rods above the person’s head and then cooking them to set the hair. This method allowed hair styles to last several days. Because she was working for Walker, her invention was credited to Madam Walker’s company and she received almost no money for it. In 1945, Joyner co-founded the United Beauty School Owners and Teachers Association and in 1973, at the age of 77, she earned her Bachelor of Science degree in psychology from Bethune-Cookman College. Joyner died December 7, 1994.

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Today in Black History, 10/23/2014

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• October 23, 1810 William Alexander Leidesdorff, one of the earliest Black settlers in California and often called the first Black millionaire, was born in St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Leidesdorff left St. Croix when he was 15 for schooling in Denmark and after that went to New Orleans, Louisiana where he worked as a ship captain from 1834 to 1840. In 1841, he moved to California where he launched the first steamboat to operate on San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento River. He also built the first hotel and the first shipping warehouse. In 1844, Leidesdorff became a naturalized Mexican citizen and received a land grant of 35,521 acres. He went on to establish extensive commercial relations throughout Hawaii, Alaska, and Mexican California. When the United States took over California, Leidesdorff was one of three members on the first San Francisco school board and was later elected city treasurer. He also donated the land for the first public school. In 1845, President James K. Polk hired him as the United States Vice Consul to Mexico. Leidesdorff died May 18, 1848. He was one of the wealthiest men in California and on the day of his burial, flags were flown at half-mast, business was suspended, and the schools were closed. When his estate was auctioned in 1856, it was valued at more than $1,445,000. Leidesdorff streets in San Francisco and Folsom, California are named in his honor. His biography, “William Alexander Leidesdorff: First Black Millionaire, American Consul and California Pioneer,” was published in 2005.

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 33: "Women in the Civil War"

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OCTOBER 2014: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

The stories of Cathay Williams, Mary Bowser, Susie King Taylor, and Sojourner Truth demonstrate that African American women contributed to and aided Civil War efforts in a variety of crucial ways. Often lost, ignored, or simply overlooked in the history of the Civil War, these women’s stories serve as an important reminder of black women’s active roles and experiences during wartime.

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President's Message, October 2014

Posted by Juanita Moore
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Juanita Moore, President & CEO of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African Americ
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When my daughter Shalewa was four years old, I wished for her what any mother wishes for her child – that she have all the opportunities possible to grow up safely and securely, and become a responsible, caring, and accomplished adult. But that’s not all… I also wished for her to be as strong as Harriet Tubman, as conscientious as Sojourner Truth, as eloquent as Frederick Douglass, as idealistic as Abraham Lincoln, and as inspirational as Maya Angelou.

As Shalewa herself would attest, I had high hopes – and standards!

And we should! We should have high standards, the highest standards for our children, so that they may inherit their world with the strength and skills necessary to navigate life. But that means we must also provide them all the opportunities necessary to learn, to grow, to feel safe, and to feel whole.

The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History helps serve this very special constituency in the community. Each and every month, thousands upon thousands of school children from across the region stream through our doors to bear witness to the breadth and depth of the African American experience.

From educational outreach and literacy programs, to health and wellness workshops, this museum performs a range of services and serves an array of purposes in the community. It’s not only a source of pride for our city and region, it helps inspire pride and understanding among our children, and will for generations to come. That is, perhaps, our most important work – to open minds and change lives.

We want every child to feel as strong as Joe Louis, as curious as George Washington Carver, as accomplished as Paul Robeson, as courageous as Rosa Parks, and as committed as Dr. Charles H. Wright.

The Wright Museum and its staff are committed to making these opportunities possible – and possibilities attainable – for all children. Whether you are a first-time visitor or long-time member, thank you for your continued support in helping The Wright Museum help every child to achieve their dreams.

WELCOME A-BOARD!
For our museum, a strong and committed board is vital to the institution’s success. We are pleased to welcome these newest members to our Board of Trustees: Pamela Alexander, director of community development and fund operations, Ford Motor Company Fund and Community Services; Rumia Ambrose-Burbank, president, VMS365; Tom Lewand, Sr., group executive for jobs and economic growth, City of Detroit; Suzanne Shank, president & CEO, Siebert Brandford Shank & Co.; and S. Gary Spicer, Sr., Law Offices of S. Gary Spicer, Sr. Given the esteemed group these new trustees are joining, we know the museum is in very good hands as we embark upon our 50th anniversary.

 

October 2014-thumb

Click here to download our October 2014 Member Newsletter

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Today in Black History, 10/22/2014

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• October 22, 1854 James Alan Bland, hall of fame songwriter and musician, was born in Flushing, New York but raised in Washington, D. C. Bland began performing professionally at 14. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Howard University in 1873. Bland toured the United States and Europe, spending 20 years in London, England. While in Europe, he performed for Queen Victoria and the Prince of Wales. Bland wrote more than 700 songs, including “In the Evening by the Moonlight,” “O Dem Golden Slippers,” and “Carry Me Back to Old Virginny” which in a slightly modified form was made the official state song of Virginia in 1940. Although Bland made as much as $10,000 per year, he died penniless May 5, 1911 and was buried in an unmarked grave without a funeral. In 1939, his grave was found by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers who landscaped it and erected a monument. Bland was posthumously inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970. Housing projects in Flushing and Alexandria, Virginia are named in his honor.

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Today in Black History, 10/21/2014

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• October 21, 1864 Alfred B. Hilton, Congressional Medal of Honor recipient, died of wounds received at the Battle of Chaffin’s Farm during the Civil War. Hilton was born in Harford County, Maryland in 1842. On September 29, 1864, Hilton was serving as a sergeant in the 4th Regiment Colored Infantry when his unit participated in the Battle of Chaffin’s Farm on the outskirts of Richmond, Virginia. During the battle, Hilton carried the American flag as part of the unit’s color guard. As he charged the enemy fortifications, he grabbed the regimental colors from a wounded comrade. When he was seriously wounded, he called out “Boys, save the colors.” Two of his fellow soldiers grabbed the flags before they could touch the ground. On April 6, 1865, Hilton was posthumously awarded the medal, America’s highest military decoration, for his actions during the battle. Sergeant Major Christian Fleetwood and Private Charles Veale, both African Americans, also received the Congressional Medal of Honor for their actions during the battle.

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Today in Black History, 10/20/2014

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• October 20, 1849 William Washington Browne, educator, minister and businessman, was born enslaved in Habersham County, Georgia. At 15, Browne ran away and joined the Union Army during the Civil War. After the war, he attended school in Wisconsin and then returned to the South in 1869 to teach in Georgia and Alabama. After becoming a Methodist minister in 1876, he urged the formation of groups to pool money and buy land. In 1889, he organized the True Reformers Savings Bank in Richmond, Virginia, the first Black bank in the United States to receive a charter. At its peak in 1907, it took in more than $1 million in deposits. Browne was one of only eight men, including Booker T. Washington, selected to represent African Americans at the Cotton States and International Exposition in 1895. Browne died December 21, 1897 and his funeral was one of the largest ever seen in Richmond’s Black community.

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Today in Black History, 10/19/2014

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• October 19, 1859 Byrd Prillerman, co-founder of West Virginia State College, was born enslaved in Shady Grove, Virginia. After being freed, Prillerman began school at 12 and earned his Bachelor of Science degree in 1889 from Knoxville College. He earned his Master of Arts degree from Westminster College in 1894 and his Doctor of Letters degree from Selma University in 1919. In 1891, along with Rev. C. H. Payne, Prillerman secured legislative action to create the West Virginia Colored Institute which opened its doors the following year with Prillerman as the head of the Department of English. He taught in that capacity until 1909 when he was elected president of the institution, a position he held until his retirement in 1919. Prillerman was also one of the organizers, and for many years president, of the West Virginia Teachers’ Association. One of his favorite sayings was “a well painted two-story house owned by a Negro is sharper than a two-edged sword.” Prillerman died April 25, 1929. Byrd Prillerman High School in Amigo, West Virginia is named in his honor.

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Today in Black History, 10/18/2014

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• October 18, 1763 John Chavis, minister and educator, was born in North Carolina. Little is known of his early life although it is believed that he worked as an indentured servant. Chavis enlisted in the army during the Revolutionary War and served in the 5th Virginia Regiment for three years. After the war, he took private classes and in 1795 enrolled at the Liberty Hall Academy (now Washington and Lee University). In 1800, he graduated, with high honors, and was granted a license to preach. From 1800 to 1807, he served as a circuit riding missionary ministering to enslaved and free Black people in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. In 1808, Chavis opened a school in his home in Raleigh, North Carolina where he taught White and Black children. His school was one of the best in the state and the children of some of the most prominent White families studied there. After the Nat Turner Rebellion in 1831, North Carolina passed laws that forbade Black people to teach or preach. As a result, Chavis had to close his school and give up preaching. He had to rely on charity until his death June 15, 1838. Chavis Heights Apartments and Chavis Park in Raleigh are named in his honor.

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Today in Black History, 10/17/2014

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• October 17, 1711 Jupiter Hammon, the first African American published writer in America (several years earlier Phyllis Wheatley’s poems had been published in England), was born enslaved in Long Island, New York. Unlike most enslaved people, Hammon was allowed to attend school and could read and write. His first published poem, “An Evening Thought. Salvation by Christ with Penitential Cries,” was published Christmas Day, 1760. On September 24, 1786, he delivered his “Address to the Negroes of the State of New York” in which he stated “If we should ever get to Heaven, we shall find nobody to reproach us for being Black, or for being slaves.” He also said that Black people should maintain their high moral standards precisely because slaves on earth had already secured their place in heaven. Hammon remained enslaved his whole life and died around 1806. Hammon’s story is told in “America’s First Negro Poet: The Complete Works of Jupiter Hammon of Long Island” (1970) and “Jupiter Hammon and the Biblical Beginnings of African American Literature” (1993).

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Today in Black History, 10/16/2014

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• October 16, 1825 William Howard Day, editor, educator and minister, was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. As a young man, Day was apprenticed as a printer. He earned his bachelor’s degree, the only Black student in a class of 50, and Master of Arts degree from Oberlin College in 1847 and 1859, respectively. Day moved to Cleveland, Ohio in 1847 where he edited the Cleveland True Democrat from 1851 to 1853 and published the Aliened American, Cleveland’s first Black newspaper, from 1853 to 1854. He also taught Latin, Greek, mathematics, and rhetoric. Day worked to repeal the Black Laws, chaired the National Convention of Freemen, and helped to organize the Negro Suffrage Society. In 1856, he moved to Buxton, Canada to teach previously enslaved Black people. Day visited England in 1859 where he preached and raised over $35,000 for schools and churches serving Black people in Canada. After returning to the United States, he served as inspector-general of Freedmen’s Bureau schools for four years. In 1878, Day was elected to the Harrisburg school board where he served for six terms, including two years as president. He was ordained a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1866 and earned his Doctor of Divinity degree from Livingstone College in 1887. Day died December 3, 1900. The William Howard Day Cemetery in Steelton, Pennsylvania and William Howard Day Homes in Harrisburg are named in his honor.

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Fall in Love with Detroit Social Media Photo Contest #313DLove

Posted by Pam Perry
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You love Detroit? Show us!

There’s not many other places in the country where you can truly experience four complete seasons, especially as vividly as you can in Michigan. Arguably, one of the best seasons is Fall—the colors, the apple orchards, the haunted houses, and of course, football! It really is a great time to explore #PureMichigan.

We invite you to play a little game of “Show and Tell” with us! While you’re out and about, put your photography skills to work to share what you LOVE to do in and around Detroit in the fall. Your picture might just win you some great #313Dlove prizes.

313dlove

The process to play is simple:

Step 1: Take a photo of you/your friends doing something fun that represents Metro Detroit in the fall

Step 2: Write whatever caption you like but BE SURE to leave room for #313DLove

Step 3: Share on Instagram (make sure your account is public to be eligible)

We will randomly be sharing our favorite photo of the day on our sites social networks. Then on November 13, we will pick our official winner. In addition to having their photo plastered all over the internet, the winner will walk away with the following prizes:

  • Two tickets to the BIG #313DLove event on March 13, 2015 at the Charles H. Wright Musuem

  • The winning photo will be shared on the big screen during the event

  • Two year-long passes to the Charles H. Wright Museum of African History

  • A limited edition “Love for Detroit” t-shirt

  • A $25 gift card to Real Urban Bar b que (better known as R.U.B. Pub)

  • And something even bigger...we’ll figure that out soon.

Fine print, by submitting your photo and tagging it #313DLove you agree that we may use said photo as part of our movement to change the narrative in, around and about Detroit. Thank you for playing and BEST OF LUCK!

Source: https://www.facebook.com/313DLove



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